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About Medical Schools

Bmat Overview

What is the BMAT?

The BioMedical Admissions Test (BMAT) is a standardised test used for admissions into several UK medical schools and NTU’s Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine in Singapore.

What is tested on the BMAT?

Thinking Skills (32)

Critical Thinking (16)
Problem Solving (16)

Total time (min)

60

What it tests

Critical thinking skills often required for undergraduate study.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Scientific Knowledge & Applications (27)

Mathematics (6)
Chemistry (7)
Physics (7)
Biology (7)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

Core scientific knowledge and the ability to apply it.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Writing Task
Total time (min)

30

What it tests

The capacity to consider different aspects of a proposition, and to communicate them effectively in writing.

Scoring

Quality of content scored from 1-5
Quality of language scored from A-E

Who needs the BMAT?

Applicants to the medical schools of the following universities are required to sit for the BMAT.

Singapore Medical Council approved UK universities

Imperial College London
University College London
University of Cambridge
University of Oxford

Singapore universities

Nanyang Technological University – Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine

Other UK universities

Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Keele University
Lancaster University
University of Leeds

When should I take the BMAT?

Next BMAT date

3 November 2021

Registration Deadline

1 October 2021

BMAT Exam Registration

Where should I register for the BMAT?

Students who are currently attending or have recently graduated from a local school, college, or polytechnic should register for the BMAT via the Regional Language Centre (RELC) and sit for the BMAT at their respective schools.

All other students should register for the BMAT via the British Council and sit for the BMAT at one of British Council’s centres.

Registering for the BMAT via RELC

1

Make payment via an AXS station or at the RELC EB office (only from 8:30 am to 12:00 pm on October 1, 2021). Registration before the standard deadline costs SGD 362, while registration before the late deadline (October 15, 2021) costs SGD 482. Click here for a guide on how to pay via AXS.

2

Complete the registration form on the RELC website, which will be made available on September 1, 2021. Click here for a guide on how to register via the RELC website.

3

Provide your full name and other identifying information – this must be exactly the same as seen on your photo ID – as well as the schools you are applying to.

4

Receive RELC notification email, which will tell you your testing venue and time of test.

5

Print out the RELC notification email. Make sure to bring the notification email and your photo ID on the test day!

Registering for the BMAT via British Council

1

2

Provide your full name and other identifying information – this must be exactly the same as seen on your photo ID – as well as the schools you are applying to.

3

Make payment via bank transfer to the British Council (bank account details can be found in the registration form). To facilitate tracking of your payment, quote your name and the examination you are taking (i.e. BMAT) in the comments section of your transaction. Then, email the registration form to this email address.

Alternatively, you may register and pay in-person at the British Council Napier Road Centre. Registration before the standard deadline costs SGD 365, while registering before the late deadline (October 15, 2021) costs SGD 445.

4

Receive your confirmation email, which will tell you your testing venue and time of test.

5

Print out the confirmation email. Make sure to bring the confirmation email and your photo ID on the test day!

BMAT Percentiles

Section Percentiles

Each year, the BMAT releases the distribution of scores for each of the three sections in the test: Thinking Skills, Scientific Knowledge & Applications, and Writing Task – the Writing Task scores are further divided into scores for Quality of Content and Quality of Language.

In general, we recommend that students score at least 6.5 for Thinking Skills and Scientific Knowledge & Applications, and at least 4A for the Writing Task.

The 2020 test breakdown can be found here.

BMAT Strategies

  • Thinking Skills
  • Familiarise yourself with all the question types in this section, and the strategies required to solve each question type. IvyPrep’s classes will systematically break down every single question type and how to tackle each one of them.

  • Scientific Knowledge & Applications
  • Know the required scientific knowledge for all four sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics), especially for the popular topics that come out in the BMAT every year.

    IvyPrep’s classes will break down the topics for each of the four sciences, filling core gaps in your knowledge and showing you how to tackle the BMAT style of science questions.

  • Writing Task
  • Be well-versed in the rubric, and know how to write an essay that fits the requirements for the highest score. IvyPrep’s classes will show you how to write a concise yet effective essay that meets all of the exam requirements.

  • Practice, practice, practice
  • IvyPrep’s proprietary online learning platform contains hundreds of practice questions, as well as full-length practice tests.

Thinking Skills

Familiarise yourself with all the question types in this section, and the strategies required to solve each question type. IvyPrep’s classes will systematically break down every single question type and how to tackle each one of them.

Scientific Knowledge & Applications

Know the required scientific knowledge for all four sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics), especially for the popular topics that come out in the BMAT every year.

IvyPrep’s classes will break down the topics for each of the four sciences, filling core gaps in your knowledge and showing you how to tackle the BMAT style of science questions.

Writing Task

Be well-versed in the rubric, and know how to write an essay that fits the requirements for the highest score. IvyPrep’s classes will show you how to write a concise yet effective essay that meets all of the exam requirements.

Practice, practice, practice

IvyPrep’s proprietary online learning platform contains hundreds of practice questions for your practice, as well as three full-length practice tests.

UCAT Overview

What is the UCAT?

The University Clinical Admissions Test (UCAT) is a standardised test used for admissions into several UK medical schools. 

What is tested on the UCAT?

SECTION# OF QUESTIONSTOTAL TIME (MINS)WHAT IT TESTSSCORING
Verbal Reasoning4421Ability to critically evaluate written information.300-900
Decision Making2931Ability to use complex information to make sound decisions and judgements.300-900
Quantitative Reasoning3624Ability to critically evaluate numerical information.300-900
Abstract Reasoning5513Ability to use convergent and divergent thinking to infer visual relationships.300-900
Situational Judgement6926Capacity to understand real world situations and to identify critical factors and appropriate behaviour in dealing with them. Band 1 (highest) - Band 4 (lowest)
Section
(No. of questions)

Thinking Skills (32)
Critical Thinking (16)
Problem Solving (16)

Total time (min)

60

What it tests

Generic thinking skills often required for undergraduate study.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Scientific Knowledge & Applications (27)
Mathematics (6)
Chemistry (7)
Physics (7)
Biology (7)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

Core scientific knowledge and the ability to apply it.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Writing Task (1 out of 3)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

The capacity to consider different aspects of a proposition, and to communicate them effectively in writing.

Scoring

Quality of content scored from 1-5
Quality of language scored from A-E

Who needs the UCAT? 

Applicants to the medical schools from the following universities are required to sit for the UCAT.

Singapore Medical Council approved
UK universities

University of Dundee
University of Leicester
University of Birmingham
University of Liverpool
University of Bristol
University of Manchester
Cardiff University
Queen Mary, University of London
University of Edinburgh
University of Sheffield
University of Glasgow
University of Southampton
St. George’s University of London
King's College London

Other
UK universities

University of Aberdeen
University of Newcastle
University of Nottingham
Durham University
Plymouth University
University of East Anglia
University of Warwick
Queen’s University Belfast
University of Exeter
Hull York Medical School
University of St. Andrews
Keele University

When should I take the UCAT? 

First UCAT date FOR 2021

26 July 2021

Registration opens

2 June 2021

Last UCAT date FOR 2021

29 September 2021

Registration closes 

22 September 2021

The UCAT can be taken any time during the testing window.
We recommend registering for the test as early as possible to secure a testing slot. 

UCAT Exam Registration

How do I register for the UCAT?

1

Register for or sign in to your free Pearson VUE account.

2

Provide your full name and other identifying information — this must be exactly the same as seen on your photo ID — as well as the schools you are applying to.

3

Select your test centre, test date, and test timeslot.

4

Make payment, and check out.

5

Receive the appointment confirmation email from Pearson VUE.

6

Print out the confirmation email. Make sure to bring the confirmation email and your photo ID on the test day!

Where can I take the UCAT in 2021?

Here are the UCAT testing centres in Singapore. Note that not all test centres are available for all dates.
Click here for the latest information.

Pearson Professional Centers-Singapore

51 Cuppage Road, #05-02/03/04, Singapore 229469

Ingram Micro
Asia Ltd

205, Kallang Bahru, #02-00, Singapore 339341

NTUC LearningHub
Pte Ltd

NTUC Trade Union House, 73 Bras Basah Road, Level 3, Room 3J, Singapore 189556

UCAT PERCENTILES

Score Percentiles

The UCAT gives you a percentile ranking for your composite score (out of 3600), excluding Situational Judgement. Your percentile rank tells you how you did on the UCAT compared to other test-takers. For example, if you have a percentile ranking of 90, it means that you scored higher than 90% of other students who took that test. Your exact percentile ranking can be found using the percentile lookup tool here.

These are the results from the 2020 UCAT administration. 

PERCENTILE RANKINGCOMPOSITE SCORE (EXCLUDING SITUATIONAL JUDGMENT)
902850
802730
702640
602570
502500
402430
302360
202270
102150
Section
(No. of questions)

Thinking Skills (32)
Critical Thinking (16)
Problem Solving (16)

Total time (min)

60

What it tests

Generic thinking skills often required for undergraduate study.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Scientific Knowledge & Applications (27)
Mathematics (6)
Chemistry (7)
Physics (7)
Biology (7)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

Core scientific knowledge and the ability to apply it.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Writing Task (1 out of 3)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

The capacity to consider different aspects of a proposition, and to communicate them effectively in writing.

Scoring

Quality of content scored from 1-5
Quality of language scored from A-E

In general, we recommend that students score at least 2700, and at least Band 2 for Situational Judgement.

UCAT Strategies

Verbal Reasoning

Know how to read the passages strategically and answer the questions efficiently. IvyPrep’s classes will teach you how to effectively look for verbal information in the passage using our tried-and-tested strategy.

Decision Making

Familiarise yourself with all the question types in this section, and the strategies required to solve each question type.

IvyPrep’s classes will systematically break down every single question type and how to tackle each one of them.

Quantitative Reasoning

Make accurate mathematical calculations and answer questions efficiently. IvyPrep’s classes will teach you the required mathematical knowledge and show you how to find the correct answer in the shortest amount of time.

Abstract Reasoning

Cut through the overwhelming visual noise and spot the relevant patterns and sequences effectively.

IvyPrep’s classes will show you how to efficiently sort through the visual information in this section, helping you to get the most number of correct answers in the limited amount of time allocated for this section.

Situational Judgement

Familiarise yourself with the code of ethics required for doctors and medical students. Through realistic scenarios, IvyPrep’s classes will help you understand the thought processes medical personnel undergo when faced with difficult situations on an everyday basis, and the appropriate actions to take when faced with these situations.

Practice, practice, practice

IvyPrep’s proprietary online learning platform contains hundreds of practice questions for your practice, full-length section practices for each section, as well as three full-length practice tests.

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Know how to read the passages strategically and answer the questions efficiently. IvyPrep’s classes will teach you how to effectively look for verbal information in the passage using our tried-and-tested strategy.

  • Decision Making
  • Familiarise yourself with all the question types in this section, and the strategies required to solve each question type. IvyPrep’s classes will systematically break down every single question type and how to tackle each one of them.

  • Quantitative Reasoning
  • Make accurate mathematical calculations and answer questions efficiently. IvyPrep’s classes will teach you the required mathematical knowledge and show you how to find the correct answer in the shortest amount of time.

  • Abstract Reasoning
  • Cut through the overwhelming visual noise and spot the relevant patterns and sequences effectively. IvyPrep’s classes will show you how to efficiently sort through the visual information in this section, helping you to get the most number of correct answers in the limited amount of time allocated for this section.

  • Situational Judgement
  • Familiarise yourself with the code of ethics required for doctors and medical students. Through realistic scenarios, IvyPrep’s classes will help you understand the thought processes medical personnel undergo when faced with difficult situations on an everyday basis, and the appropriate actions to take when faced with these situations.

  • Practice, practice, practice
  • IvyPrep’s proprietary online learning platform contains hundreds of practice questions, as well as full-length practice tests.

YOUR APPLICATION TIMELINE

WHAT IS MY TIMELINE FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL?

The University Clinical Admissions Test (UCAT) is a standardised test used for admissions into several UK medical schools. 

TIMELINE
Before Year of ApplicationFocus on achieving your A-Level/IB Target Scores.

Source and participate in internships/research placements/volunteering to demonstrate your interest in medicine.
Spring of Year of ApplicationNarrow down your school choices.

Determine whether you need to take the BMAT or the UCAT, or both, and when.

Start brainstorming ideas for your UCAS Personal Statement.
JulyUCAT Test Season begins.

Finalize your school choices.
SeptemberFirst BMAT Test Date (cancelled in 2021 due to COVID-19 pandemic).

UCAS Application opens.

UCAT Applications close.
OctoberUCAS Medical School Applications close on October 15.

Last UCAT Test Dates.
NovemberSecond BMAT Test Date.
November to March (approximately)
Medical School Interviews and Offers.
Section
(No. of questions)

Thinking Skills (32)
Critical Thinking (16)
Problem Solving (16)

Total time (min)

60

What it tests

Generic thinking skills often required for undergraduate study.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Scientific Knowledge & Applications (27)
Mathematics (6)
Chemistry (7)
Physics (7)
Biology (7)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

Core scientific knowledge and the ability to apply it.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Writing Task (1 out of 3)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

The capacity to consider different aspects of a proposition, and to communicate them effectively in writing.

Scoring

Quality of content scored from 1-5
Quality of language scored from A-E

Medical Shadowing

Getting a medical internship can significantly improve your medical school application, as these experiences demonstrate proactiveness and interest in the medical field. Here are some tips to help you get a medical internship.

  • Figure out your speciality  of interest
  • Think about the medical speciality which you are interested in: be it cardiology, radiology, or oncology. You can start by reflecting on which area of the human body you are most interested in, and searching for opportunities in that field.

  • Talk to your peers
  • Start a network with your other friends who are also interested in applying to medical school. Through this network, you can coordinate opportunities to intern at various medical institutions. Working together with your peers at a medical institution can also make the internship a lot more interesting!

  • Look for mentors
  • Mentors can guide you through the complicated process of applying for a medical internship, and give you valuable tips and advice for your medical school application journey.

  • Don’t overlook the mundane
  • Often, an internship with your general practitioner can be just as valuable as an internship with a high-profile doctor in a hospital. Medical schools want students who are not just attracted by the most glamorous aspects of medicine, but can also handle the prosaic day-to-day work that doctors undergo.

  • Don’t just do, think
  • Reflecting upon what you want to get out of your medical internship is often much more valuable than the experience you get out of the internship. Keeping a journal of your reflections about your experiences not only allows you to learn more about yourself and what you want out of medicine, but can also provide you with a valuable starting point for your UCAS personal statements.

Figure out your speciality of interest

Think about the medical speciality which you are interested in: be it cardiology, radiology, or oncology. You can start by reflecting on which area of the human body you are most interested in, and searching for opportunities in that field.

Talk to your peers

Start a network with your other friends who are also interested in applying to medical school. Through this network, you can coordinate opportunities to intern at various medical institutions. Working together with your peers at a medical institution can also make the internship a lot more interesting!

Look for mentors

Mentors can guide you through the complicated process of applying for a medical internship, and give you valuable tips and advice in your medical school application journey. IvyPrep can connect you with our network of mentors to give you additional support in your medical school application.

Don’t overlook the mundane

Often, an internship with your general practitioner can be just as valuable as an internship with a high-profile doctor in a hospital. Medical schools want students who are not just attracted by the most glamorous aspects of medicine, but can also handle the prosaic day-to-day work that doctors undergo.

Don’t just do, think

Reflecting upon what you want to get out of your medical internship is often much more valuable than the experience you get out of the internship. Keeping a journal of your reflections about your experiences can not allow you to learn more about yourself and what you want out of medicine, but can also provide you with a valuable starting point for your UCAS personal statements.

How to Prepare for Medicine Interviews

  • WHY DO UNIVERSITIES CONDUCT MEDICAL INTERVIEWS?
  • While your academics and personal statements give the universities some insights into your ability to succeed in university, they do not paint a complete picture. By conducting interviews, medical schools can gain a better insight into whether you are suited to become a doctor. 
  • How do I get a medical interview?
  • Most medical schools receive far more applicants than they can actually interview – let alone admit! As such, your academic results (i.e. your A Levels, IB, or equivalent) and your standardised test scores (i.e. BMAT or UCAT) are often the first benchmark universities use to select whom to invite for an interview. It is thus paramount that you do well in your academics! You can contact IvyPrep to learn more about preparing for the BMAT and the UCAT.
  • What formats of medical interviews are there?
  • Medical school interviews have two main formats.

Panel interviews

In this format of interview, you are given 15-30 minutes to speak with a panel of interviewers. The interviewers you face can range from admission tutors, professors, to even current medical students.

Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI)

As the name suggests, this format of interview consists of multiple stations (around 6-10), and you are only given a short amount of time at each station (typically around 5 minutes). You will be given a variety of tasks at each station, ranging from answering simple interview questions, role-playing, or even conducting a physical demonstration.

  • Traditionally, these interviews were conducted in-person in the UK, meaning that candidates had to fly to the UK to complete the interview. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many universities have now switched to remote online interviews. For the most updated information, refer to the university website.
  • Medical school interview details
  • The following list is restricted to the Singapore Medical Council approved universities, and is accurate for the 2020 admissions cycle. Information about the 2021 admissions cycle will be included when more information is available. 
  • Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all UK medical schools conducted interviews remotely for the 2020 admissions cycle. As the COVID-19 pandemic situation continues to evolve, we recommend that you check the university website for the most updated information.
UNIVERSITYINTERVIEW FORMAT
University of BirminghamMMI
University of Bristol Panel
University of CambridgePanel
University of DundeePanel
The University of EdinburghMMI
University of GlasgowPanel
University of LeicesterMMI
University of LiverpoolPanel
King's College LondonPanel
Queen Mary University of London,
Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry
Panel
University College LondonPanel
St George’s University of LondonMMI
The University of ManchesterMMI
University of NottinghamPanel
University of OxfordPanel
The University of SheffieldPanel
University of SouthamptonPanel
Imperial College LondonMMI
Cardiff UniversityMMI
Section
(No. of questions)

Thinking Skills (32)
Critical Thinking (16)
Problem Solving (16)

Total time (min)

60

What it tests

Generic thinking skills often required for undergraduate study.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Scientific Knowledge & Applications (27)
Mathematics (6)
Chemistry (7)
Physics (7)
Biology (7)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

Core scientific knowledge and the ability to apply it.

Scoring

0.0 - 9.0

Section
(No. of questions)

Writing Task (1 out of 3)

Total time (min)

30

What it tests

The capacity to consider different aspects of a proposition, and to communicate them effectively in writing.

Scoring

Quality of content scored from 1-5
Quality of language scored from A-E

  • Medical interview strategy General interview tips

  • Dress well
  • A good first impression is paramount for a good interview performance. Regardless of whether the interview is conducted online or in-person, dress as you would if you were a doctor – that is, business casual at the minimum.

  • Know the interview format
  • This is a no-brainer. Don’t prepare for an MMI when the school you are interviewing for conducts panel interviews! Make sure to keep abreast with the latest information about the interview format. Check the interview invitation email or the school website to find out more.

  • Know what will be asked
  • Some universities release information about the questions that will be asked in the interview, either on their website or in the interview invitation email that they send out. Take the time to prepare for these questions before your interview.

  • Know your school
  • Since the UCAS personal statement is general to all the medical schools you apply to, the medical interview is the only opportunity for the university to ask school-specific questions. Make sure to read up about the university you are applying for! 

  • Know the type of questions you may be asked
  • Try to systematically cover all the different types of questions that can be asked in an medical school interview, as well as the answering strategies for each type of question.

  • Practice, practice, practice
  • Polish your interview skills and answer questions confidently!

Dress well

A good first impression is paramount for a good interview performance. Regardless of whether the interview is conducted online or in-person, dress as you would if you were a doctor – that is, business casual at the minimum.

Know the interview format

This is a no-brainer. Don’t prepare for an MMI when the school you are interviewing for conducts panel interviews! Make sure to keep abreast with the latest information about the interview format. Check the interview invitation email or the school website to find out more.

Know what will be asked

Some universities release information about the questions that will be asked in the interview, either on their website or in the interview invitation email that they send out. Take the time to prepare for these questions before your interview.

Know your school

Since the UCAS personal statement is tailored to all the medical schools you apply to, the medical interview is the only opportunity for the university to ask school-specific questions. Make sure to read up about the university you are applying for! 

Know the type of questions you may be asked

Try to systematically cover all the different types of questions that can be asked in an medical school interview, as well as the answering strategies for each type of question.

Practice, practice, practice

Polish your interview skills and answer questions confidently!

  • Online interview tips
  • With the travel restrictions associated with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is highly likely that universities will continue with remote online interviews, at least for international applicants. Here are some tips specifically for online interviews.

  • Familiarise yourself with the program being used for your interview
  • There are a litany of video-conferencing platforms available: Zoom, Skype, Google Meet, etc. In your interview invitation letter, your university should give you information about which platform they will be using. Take the time to get acquainted with the platform being used so that you are not fumbling around on the day of your interview.

  • Use a wired connection if possible
  • Wired LAN connections are less prone to disruptions than wireless connections. Try to acquire a LAN cable to connect to your computer to reduce the possibility of laggy connections.

  • Find an appropriate room to have your interview
  • A room with a plain background is best, although any background that is not too distracting is fine. Avoid using virtual backgrounds, as these can be distracting. Make sure to also have the interview in a quiet location to minimise possible disruptions.

Familiarise yourself with the program being used for your interview

There are a litany of video-conferencing platforms available: Zoom, Skype, Google Meet, etc. In your interview invitation letter, your university should give you information about which platform they will be using. Take the time to get acquainted with the platform being used so that you are not fumbling around on the day of your interview.

Use a wired connection if possible

Wired LAN connections are less prone to disruptions than wireless connections. Try to acquire a LAN cable to connect to your computer to reduce the possibility of laggy connections.

Find an appropriate room to have your interview

A room with a plain background is best, although any background that is not too distracting is fine. Avoid using virtual backgrounds, as these can be distracting. Make sure to also have the interview in a quiet location to minimise possible disruptions.